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Museum Events in New York City This Weekend - February 16-February 18

February 12, 2018 - by CG Directory Editor
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Museum Events in New York City This Weekend Photo: F. Dassan/Flickr 


The Met, the MoMA, the Guggenheim, the Whitney, and the Museum of Natural History ? these are just a sampling of the many great museums open to the city. If you're wanting to spend some time exploring these cultural gems, then City Guide's guide to museum events in New York City this weekend will be your best companion.

Dark Days of Winter Candlelight Ghost Tour of 'Manhattan's Most Haunted House' (The New York Times) - Merchant's House Museum
February 16, 2018 - New York

Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where seven family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.

Art in the Round Public Tours - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
February 16, 2018 - New York

Brancusi: Between Tradition and Modernity with Stephanie Jeanjean, Gallery Educator: Discuss Brancusi's provocative use of materials and artistic references. Art in the Round public tours are led by gallery educators. Specialists in fields of art, art history, and gallery teaching, educators provide informative and meaningful experiences by engaging visitors in a shared process of close looking and conversation, with the occasional surprise. For everyone from first-time visitors to long-term members, these daily tours are invaluable for learning about the collection, special exhibitions, and the Frank Lloyd Wright building. Visitors of all ages and abilities are encouraged and welcome to join. These tours are free with admission and meet on the rotunda floor. No RSVP is required.

Watson Adventures’ Murder at the Met Scavenger Hunt - Metropolitan Museum of Art
Through February 17, 2018 - New York

Join Watson Adventures on a murder mystery scavenger hunt for adults at the Metropolitan Museum! A murdered curator has left behind a cryptic trail of clues connected with secrets in works of art. As your team gathers answers about the art, you'll learn a sordid tale revolving around a planned purchase of a rare painting by Leonardo da Vinci. You’ll have to crack a secret code in order to solve this murder. Price includes museum admission. Advance purchase is required.

Life of David Hockney - Albertine
February 17, 2018 - New York

An Afternoon with Catherine Cusset Join award-winning French author Catherine Cusset as she presents her latest novel, Vie de David Hockney (Gallimard) which recounts real events from the life of Britain's greatest living painter, while imagining his thoughts and feelings. David Hockney is currently the subject of a major retrospective at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. In French. Free and open to the public. No RSVP necessary. Catherine Cusset is the author of thirteen novels, including Le problème avec Jane (Grand Prix littéraire des lectrices d'Elle 2000), Un brillant avenir (Prix Goncourt des Lycéens 2008), and L'Autre qu'on adorait (finalist for Prix Goncourt 2016), Her work has been translated into fifteen languages. The Story of Jane was published in the US by Simon and Shuster in 2001.

Free Saturdays - Jewish Museum
February 17, 2018 - New York

In Judaism, Saturday is the Sabbath, a day of rest, free from the concerns of schedules, everyday work, and commerce. For this reason interactive exhibition elements, audio guides, our Shop, and the children's exhibition are not available. In observance of the Sabbath, admission is free on Saturdays

New! Black History in Downtown Brooklyn - The Municipal Art Society of New York
February 17, 2018 - New York

Unsung heroes walked our streets—it's time their stories were told. WITH SUZANNE SPELLEN AND MORGAN MUNSEY Brooklyn has been home to both enslaved and free African Americans since the Dutch landed in the early 1600s. Slavery ended in New York State in 1827. By the next decade, most of Brooklyn's black population was settled in what is now DUMBO and Downtown Brooklyn. Here were homes, schools, businesses and churches. Mid-19th century Brooklyn was a hotbed of organized Abolitionist activity, with both black and white activists who changed the course of American history. This tour celebrates these people, and takes you to where they lived and worked.

Art in the Round Public Tours - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
February 17, 2018 - New York

On Being Open and Empty with Filip Noterdaeme, Gallery Educator: Explore the connection between Frank Lloyd Wright's architecture and the principles of Taoism. Art in the Round public tours are led by gallery educators. Specialists in fields of art, art history, and gallery teaching, educators provide informative and meaningful experiences by engaging visitors in a shared process of close looking and conversation, with the occasional surprise. For everyone from first-time visitors to long-term members, these daily tours are invaluable for learning about the collection, special exhibitions, and the Frank Lloyd Wright building. Visitors of all ages and abilities are encouraged and welcome to join. These tours are free with admission and meet on the rotunda floor. No RSVP is required.

WASHINGTON’S BIRTHDAY BALL - Mount Vernon Hotel Museum & Garden
February 18, 2018 - New York

In honor of Presidents’ Day, celebrate the birthday of our nation’s first President as New Yorkers did in the 19th century. Costumed dancers will perform and teach traditional country dances and encourage everyone to join in. Festivities include toasts to George Washington and historic refreshments, including Washington Cake. Museum tour and a family scavenger hunt are also included. All ages welcome Reservations required. Purchase tickets by calling the Museum at (212)838-6878 or on-line through Brown Paper Tickets here: https://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3233199 The Museum is located at 421 East 61st Street (between First and York Avenues). Bus: M15, M31 or M57; Subway: N, R, Q or 4, 5, 6 to Lexington Avenue/59th Street; or F to 63rd Street.

Retracing Black History Through Chelsea and The Tenderloin - The Municipal Art Society of New York
February 18, 2018 - New York

How African-Americans shaped Northern Chelsea WITH CHER CARDEN AND LAURENCE FROMMER Although it is often forgotten, Chelsea played a significant role in New York's African-American community and its history, particularly in the second half of the 19th Century. Join Save Chelsea board members to learn more about the churches, schools, and music that served this vibrant community.

Art in the Round Public Tours - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
February 18, 2018 - New York

Danh Vo: Take My Breath Away with Lewis Kachur, Gallery Educator: Explore Vo's use of personal narratives to address larger societal issues. Art in the Round public tours are led by gallery educators. Specialists in fields of art, art history, and gallery teaching, educators provide informative and meaningful experiences by engaging visitors in a shared process of close looking and conversation, with the occasional surprise. For everyone from first-time visitors to long-term members, these daily tours are invaluable for learning about the collection, special exhibitions, and the Frank Lloyd Wright building. Visitors of all ages and abilities are encouraged and welcome to join. These tours are free with admission and meet on the rotunda floor. No RSVP is required.

Walk on the Wild Side - American Museum of Natural History
Through February 28, 2018 - New York

Grand Central Terminal Official Guided Tour - The Municipal Art Society of New York
Through March 02, 2018 - New York

Join the Grand Central Terminal Official Guided Tour In 2013 to celebrate the terminal's centennial, MTA Metro-North Railroad teamed up with The Municipal Art Society of New York (MAS) and Orpheo Inc. to provide daily docent-guided tours of the terminal. The 75-minute tour, departing daily at 12:30 p.m. from the Terminal's Main Concourse, is led by MAS-trained docents and highlights the history, architecture and operations of one of the world's biggest train terminals. Tickets are $25 for adults and $20 for seniors, students, children under 10, members of the military, Metro-North riders bearing same-day ticket stubs, and MAS Members. Space is limited.

Roots of 'The Dinner Party': History in the Making - Brooklyn Museum
Through March 04, 2018 - Prospect Heights

Roots of "The Dinner Party": History in the Making is the first museum exhibition to examine Chicago's evolving plans for The Dinner Party in depth, detailing its development as a multilayered artwork, a triumph of community art-making, and a testament to the power of historical revisionism. Chicago's ambitious research project combatted the absence of women from mainstream historical narratives and blazed the trail for feminist art historical methodologies in an era of social change. It also validated mediums traditionally considered the domain of women and domestic labor, as the artist studied and experimented with China painting, porcelain, and needlework. The exhibition presents rarely seen test plates, research documents, ephemera, notebooks, and preparatory drawings from 1971 through 1979 alongside The Dinner Party, encouraging exploration of its formal, conceptual, and material progress.

All That You Have Is Your Soul - Gallery 8 New York
Through March 10, 2018 - New York

FACTION's inaugural New York project celebrates the building of identity from a common heritage within a community engaging Harlem exhibition. FACTION Art Projects presents their inaugural exhibition, All That You Have Is Your Soul, a group show of 17 artists, all of whom are tied together by their responses to building identity within a foreign land. The exhibition uses the link of heritage between the artists to present artworks that celebrate difference in identity.

Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting - MoMA PS1
Through March 11, 2018 - Long Island City

MoMA PS1 presents the first comprehensive retrospective of Carolee Schneemann, spanning the artist's prolific six-decade career. As one of the most influential artists of the second part of the 20th century, Schneemann's pioneering investigations into subjectivity, the social construction of the female body, and the cultural biases of art history have had significant influence on subsequent generations of artists. Carolee Schneemann: Kinetic Painting begins with rarely seen examples of the artist's early paintings of the 1950s and their evolution into assemblages made in the 1960s, which integrated objects, mechanical elements, and modes of deconstruction. In the late 1960s Schneemann began positioning her own body within her work, performing the roles of "both image and image-maker." As a central protagonist of the New York downtown avant-garde community, she explored hybrid artistic forms culminating in experimental theater events. The exhibition considers Schneemann's oeuvre within the context of painting by tracing the developments that led to her groundbreaking innovations in performance, film, and installation in the 1970s, as well as her increasingly spatialized multimedia i... (read more)

Cathy Wilkes - MoMA PS1
Through March 11, 2018 - Long Island City

MoMA PS1 will present the first solo museum exhibition in New York focused on Glasgow-based artist Cathy Wilkes (b. 1966), in conjunction with the inaugural Maria Lassnig Prize. Since the start of her career in the 1990s, Wilkes has created sculptural tableaux that engage with the rituals of life. Regularly employing quotidian products and residual materials drawn from her domestic life, Wilkes's installations connect the banalities of daily existence to larger archetypes of birth, marriage, child-rearing, and death. This combination of the personal and universal parallels a meditation at the heart of her work, in which Wilkes's art enacts an exercise in empathy, exposing deeply felt subjective experiences to reach beyond herself while also insisting upon the fundamentally private nature of artmaking. Wilkes is the first artist to receive the Maria Lassnig Prize, a biennial award established by the Maria Lassnig Foundation in June 2016 to honor the achievements of mid-career artists. The Maria Lassnig Prize was originally envisioned by pioneering Austrian artist Maria Lassnig before her death in 2014 at the age of 94, at height of her artistic powers. Having achieved recognition... (read more)

Installation - Museum of the Moving Image
Through March 13, 2018 - Queens

2014. Ezra Wube (b. 1980, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, lives in Brooklyn). Animation. 1,756 frames, photographed from canvas with oil paint. 4 minutes. Ezra Wube works with video, installation, drawing, painting, and performance. Reflecting on his identity as a person of two cultures at the intersection of tradition and modern life, Wube makes work about the uncertainty of time and place and the malleability of memory. A Memory of Astoria, commissioned by the Museum of the Moving Image, is an impressionistic portrait of the blocks surrounding this building. Wube walked the neighborhood to observe the area's confluence of cultures, focusing on everyday moments, sights, and sounds. He reconstituted these experiences into a poetic visual collage, inserting himself as a silhouetted observer exploring the memories of his walks. The production of A Memory of Astoria was an intensive, months-long process, with each frame painted in sequence on top of the last. The result is striking: street scenes assemble and disassemble, leaving visible marks of the past as if time and space have melted together. Through these impressions, Wube reveals a diverse, rapidly changing neighborhood that th... (read more)

Views of Rome and Naples: Oil Sketches from the Thaw Collection - The Morgan Library & Museum
Through March 18, 2018 - New York

During the second half of the eighteenth-century, a journey to Italy was considered an essential component in the education of young artists and noblemen from Northern Europe. Although Venice and Florence were requisite stops on the journey, artists tended to make their longest stay in Rome, and they generally also spent time in Naples. Both cities offered celebrated archeological sites and a taste of the unspoiled rural life of the campagna. Working outdoors, artists recorded their observations of these natural and man-made wonders in small-scale studies, mostly executed with oil paint on paper. In these oils, painters captured the grandiosity of Rome's classical ruins and the sublime natural beauty of Naples, with its famous view of Mount Vesuvius. Artists from France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Sweden are featured in this selection. Views of Rome and Naples is the fifth exhibition in a series drawn from the collection of oil sketches acquired by Morgan Trustee Eugene V. Thaw and his wife, Clare. Mr. Thaw is also an honorary trustee of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Hotbed - New-York Historical Society
Through March 25, 2018 - New York

Hotbed explores the vibrant political and artistic scene of Greenwich Village in the early 20th century, where men and women joined forces across the boundaries of class and race to fight for a better world. At the heart of the downtown radicals' crusade lay women's rights: to control their own bodies, to do meaningful work, and above all, to vote. Immersive installations and more than 100 artifacts and images—drawn from New-York Historical's archives and several private collections—bring to life the bohemian scene and its energetic activist spirit. The exhibition is curated by Joanna Scutts, Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Women's History, and Sarah Gordon, Senior Postdoctoral Marie Zimmermann Legacy Fellow in Women's History, under the direction of Valerie Paley, vice president, chief historian, and director of the Center for Women's History at the New-York Historical Society, and is on view in the Joyce B. Cowin Women's History Gallery.

The Beautiful Brain: The Drawings of Santiago Ramón y Cajal - Grey Art Gallery
Through March 31, 2018 - New York

The Beautiful Brain: The Drawings of Santiago Ramón y Cajal is the first U.S. museum exhibition to present the extraordinary drawings of Santiago Ramón y Cajal (Spain, 1852–1934), the father of modern neuroscience. Cajal's astonishing depictions of the brain—which combine cutting-edge scientific knowledge with consummate draftsmanship—offer much greater clarity than photographs, so much so that they are still in wide use today.Featuring approximately 80 of Cajal's drawings, the show will situate them within the history of scientific illustration from the 16th to 19th centuries, and juxtapose them with contemporary visualizations of the brain. Organized by the Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum at the University of Minnesota in collaboration with the Cajal Institute, the exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated book published by Abrams.

Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983 - MoMA : Museum of Modern Art
Through April 01, 2018 - New York

The East Village of the 1970s and 1980s continues to thrive in the global public's imagination. Located in the basement of a Polish Church at 57 St. Marks Place, Club 57 (1978–83) began as a no-budget venue for music and film exhibitions, and quickly took pride of place in a constellation of countercultural venues in downtown New York fueled by low rents, the Reagan presidency, and the desire to experiment with new modes of art, performance, fashion, music, and exhibition. A center of creative activity in the East Village, Club 57 is said to have influenced virtually every club that came in its wake. Club 57: Film, Performance, and Art in the East Village, 1978–1983 is the first major exhibition to fully examine the scene-changing, interdisciplinary life of this seminal downtown New York alternative space. The exhibition will tap into the legacy of Club 57's founding curatorial staff—film programmers Susan Hannaford and Tom Scully, exhibition organizer Keith Haring, and performance curator Ann Magnuson—to examine how the convergence of film, video, performance, art, and curatorship in the club environment of New York in the 1970s and 1980s became a model for a new spirit of inte... (read more)

Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age - The Museum of Modern Art
Through April 08, 2018 -

Drawn primarily from MoMA's collection, Thinking Machines: Art and Design in the Computer Age, 1959–1989 brings artworks produced using computers and computational thinking together with notable examples of computer and component design. The exhibition reveals how artists, architects, and designers operating at the vanguard of art and technology deployed computing as a means to reconsider artistic production. The artists featured in Thinking Machines exploited the potential of emerging technologies by inventing systems wholesale or by partnering with institutions and corporations that provided access to cutting-edge machines. They channeled the promise of computing into kinetic sculpture, plotter drawing, computer animation, and video installation. Photographers and architects likewise recognized these technologies' capacity to reconfigure human communities and the built environment. Thinking Machines includes works by John Cage and Lejaren Hiller, Waldemar Cordeiro, Charles Csuri, Richard Hamilton, Alison Knowles, Beryl Korot, Vera Molnár, Cedric Price, and Stan VanDerBeek, alongside computers designed by Tamiko Thiel and others at Thinking Machines Corporation, IBM, Olivetti, ... (read more)

Alexandra Pirici - New Museum
Through April 15, 2018 - Lower East Side

Her new project for the New Museum takes the form of an ongoing action with live performers and one holographic performer. The project approaches the concept of presence in an expanded sense, focusing in particular on its increasing dispersion. In Pirici's ongoing action—conceived especially for the New Museum's South Galleries—presence is revealed in a variety of ways: as physical body as well as artificial stand-in, avatar, and ghost, taking on the character of a memorial or monument; as image and abstraction of the living subject into quantifiable, monetizable data; and as the expanded life of "dead" objects in museum collections—using the presence of live performers to challenge their stable state and static interpretation. This new work continues Pirici's recent interrogations into the collective body through choreographies that link different temporal and spatial events in real time. In the work, performers embody amalgamated parts, intersecting with each other yet separately manipulable. Pirici's project attempts to enact the dispersion of presence and to comment on contemporary processes of abstraction that separate sign from substance and image from material support. Prop... (read more)

Sara Magenheimer - New Museum
Through April 15, 2018 - Lower East Side

Working Across a Range of Media Including Video, Sound, Performance, Sculpture, Collage, and Installation, New York–Based Artist Sara Magenheimer (B. 1981, Philadelphia, Pa) Disrupts, Manipulates, and Defamiliarizes Language with Bold Combinations of Image and Text. Her Videos Incorporate Traditional Filmic Editing Techniques Alongside Those Inspired by Music and Collage. in Syncopated Progressions of Pictures and Words, Magenheimer Pushes Against the Bounds of Narrative, Charting Circuitous Storylines Through Vernacular Associations That Invite Individual Interpretations. Through Surprising Juxtapositions of Language, Graphic Compositions, and Idiosyncratic Imagery, She Reveals How Visual and Verbal Signs Mutate and Guide Manifold Pathways to Understanding. Magenheimer Will Present a New Video Installation in the Window of the New Museum's 231 Bowery Building. This Project Is Part of a New Series of Window Installations, Which Relaunches the Program the New Museum Originally Mounted in the 1980s. in Conjunction with Her Window Installation, a Selection of Magenheimer's Films Will Also Be on View as Part of the Museum's Ongoing Screen Series. This Project Is Curated by Margot Nort... (read more)

Now and Forever: The Art of Medieval Time - The Morgan Library & Museum
Through April 29, 2018 - New York

What time is it? The question seems simple, and with a watch on your wrist or a cell phone in your hand, the answer is easy. In the Middle Ages, however, the concept of time could be approached in many different ways, with vastly different tools. Drawing upon the rich holdings of the Morgan's collection of medieval and Renaissance illuminated manuscripts, Now and Forever explores how people told time in the Middle Ages and what they thought about it. The manuscripts range in date from the eleventh to the sixteenth centuries and come from all the major countries of Europe. The exhibition begins with the quirks of the medieval calendar, exploring sacred feasts, the mysteries of Golden Numbers, the utility of Dominical Letters, and how the Middle Ages inherited the Roman Calendar of Julius Caesar. Visitors will engage with the complexities of time as defined by liturgical celebrations and their two overlapping systems of temporale (feasts of time) and sanctorale (feasts of saints), systems that still influence the way we tell time today. Now and Forever also explores how time beyond the grave preoccupied medieval people for whom life on earth was a mere dress rehearsal for the m... (read more)

Exhibition: the Tredwell Book Collection and the Changing 19th Century Culture of Books - Merchant's House Museum
Through April 30, 2018 - New York

Over the course of the their almost 100-year residency on East 4th Street, the Tredwells collected 314 books. These volumes, many inscribed, provide a glimpse into the family's interests, tastes, and intellectual pursuits over the century. It is not surprising that the most common subject/genre of literature is education, including foreign languages, since books in the 19th century were meant to be studied. Religion, biography, poetry, and fiction followed.

Cover Stories: Remembering the Twin Towers on The New Yorker - 9/11 Memorial Museum
Through May 01, 2018 - New York

“Cover Stories: Remembering the Twin Towers on The New Yorker" is an exhibition of 33 covers from the weekly news and culture magazine spanning more than four decades of the evolving New York City skyline. The exhibition takes visitors through the magazine’s depictions of the city’s experience as the Twin Towers were constructed and stood as icons of the city, their sudden absence when they were destroyed, the widely felt grief and anxieties in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, their commemoration in the years that followed, and the rebuilding of the World Trade Center site now home to The New Yorker and the 9/11 Memorial & Museum. The exhibition will run through May 2018 in the museum’s South Tower Gallery.

Tennessee Williams: No Refuge but Writing - The Morgan Library & Museum
Through May 13, 2018 - New York

One of the greatest American playwrights of the twentieth century, Tennessee Williams (1911–1983) was a master of language and a tireless craftsman. This exhibition focuses on Williams's career during the years 1939–1957, when he authored such masterpieces as The Glass Menagerie, A Streetcar Named Desire, and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. The show examines his creative process and his involvement with the production of his plays, along with their reception and lasting impact. Uniting his original drafts, private diaries, and personal letters with paintings, photographs, production stills, and other objects, the exhibition tells the story of one man's struggle for self-expression and how it changed the landscape of American drama.

Rebel Spirits: Robert F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King Jr - New York Historical Society
Through May 20, 2018 - Upper West Side

On the surface, Robert F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King Jr. were born worlds apart?culturally, geographically, racially, financially, and politically. But by the time they were killed within two months of each other in 1968, their worlds had come together. Images taken by some of the most renowned photojournalists of the era?alongside original correspondence, publications, and ephemera?illustrate the overlapping trajectory of their lives, exploring their deepening tie as well as how their interests expanded beyond civil rights and organized crime to encompass shared concerns for the poor and opposition to the war in Vietnam.

Peter Hujar: Speed of Life - The Morgan Library & Museum
Through May 20, 2018 - New York

With Speed of Life, the Morgan presents the first in-depth retrospective of the New York-based photographer Peter Hujar (1934–1987). Drawn from the extensive holdings of the artist's work at the Morgan and from nine other collections, the exhibition and its catalog explore the artist's full career, from his beginnings in the mid-1950s to his central role in the East Village art scene three decades later. Hujar's sharp, serene, square-format photographs confer gravity on the object of his attention, granting it an eternal moment's pause within the rush of passing time. Hujar focused on the spark of encounter between himself and his subject, be it a goose, a lover, an underground theatrical performer, the dappled surface of the Hudson River, or the placid features of his own face. In early adulthood Hujar worked as a studio assistant to magazine professionals and spent years in Italy with two successive partners, artists Joseph Raffael and Paul Thek. His short career in fashion photography ended in 1971, when Hujar decided the hustle of magazine work "wasn't right for me." After moving into a loft above a theater at Twelfth Street and Second Avenue in 1973, Hujar pursued a boh... (read more)

Vestiges & Verse: Notes from the Newfangled Epic - American Folk Art Museum
Through May 27, 2018 - New York

Vestiges & Verse: Notes from the Newfangled Epic unites more than two hundred and fifty works by twenty-one seminal and recently discovered self-taught artists, who will be introduced for the first time through the examination of the idiosyncratic structures of their lifelong, intricate narratives—notably, their sequential and developing aspects. Rare manuscripts, series of drawings, illustrated notebooks with coded texts, expanding cartography, journals, and multi-part collages will provide an art historical and pluridisciplinary perspective on the mechanisms behind visual storytelling.

Stephen Shore - MoMA : Museum of Modern Art
Through May 28, 2018 - New York

Stephen Shore encompasses the entirety of the artist's work of the last five decades, during which he has conducted a continual, restless interrogation of image making, from the gelatin silver prints he made as a teenager to his current engagement with digital platforms. One of the most significant photographers of our time, Stephen Shore (American, b. 1947) has often been considered alongside other artists who rose to prominence in the 1970s by capturing the mundane aspects of American popular culture in straightforward, unglamorous images. But Shore has worked with many forms of photography, switching from cheap automatic cameras to large-format cameras in the 1970s, pioneering the use of color before returning to black and white in the 1990s, and in the 2000s taking up the opportunities of digital photography, digital printing, and social media. The artist's first survey in New York to include his entire career, this exhibition will both allow for a fuller understanding of Shore's work, and demonstrate his singular vision—defined by an interest in daily life, a taste for serial and often systematic approaches, a strong intellectual underpinning, a restrained style, sly hum... (read more)

Explore Walks: Brooklyn Bridge and Lower Manhattan Walking Tour - Brooklyn Borough Hall
Through June 01, 2018 - Brooklyn

Let the entire city be your museum! Our guided walking tour starts in downtown Brooklyn and explores the history and evolving present of Brooklyn as we cross the world's most famous bridge. The tour continues up through Chinatown and back to Lower Manhattan, passing some of the most historic sites and diverse architecture in all of New York. Sites like Federal Hall, Wall Street, African Burial Ground, World Trade Center, and many more that might otherwise fly beneath the radar! The tour finishes steps from the 9/11 Memorial and Museum and ferries to the Statue of Liberty, perfect for continuing your trip!

Tarsila do Amaral: Inventing Modern Art in Brazil - MoMA : Museum of Modern Art
Through June 03, 2018 - New York

Tarsila do Amaral (Brazilian, 1886–1973) is a foundational figure in the history of modernism in Latin America. The first exhibition in the United States exclusively devoted to the artist focuses on her pivotal production from the 1920s, from her earliest Parisian works, to the emblematic modernist paintings produced in Brazil, ending with her large-scale, socially driven works of the early 1930s. The exhibition features over 130 artworks, including paintings, drawings, sketchbooks, photographs, and other historical documents drawn from collections across Latin America, Europe, and the United States. Born in São Paulo at the turn of the 19th century, Tarsila?as she is affectionately known in Brazil?studied piano, sculpture, and drawing before leaving for Paris in 1920 to attend the Académie Julian. Throughout subsequent sojourns in Paris, she studied with André Lhote, Albert Gleizes, and Fernand Léger, fulfilling what she called her "military service in Cubism," ultimately arriving at her signature painterly style of synthetic lines and sensuous volumes depicting landscapes and vernacular scenes in a rich color palette. The exhibition follows her journeys between France and Braz... (read more)

Derrick Adams: Sanctuary - MAD Museum of Art and Design
Through August 12, 2018 - Columbus Circle

Derrick Adams is a New York–based, multidisciplinary artist working in performance, video, sound, textile- and paper-based collage, and multimedia sculpture. His practice is rooted in deconstructivist philosophies such as the fragmentation and manipulation of structure and surface, and the marriage of complex and improbable forms. Through these techniques, Adams examines the force of popular culture and the media on the perception and construction of self-image.Derrick Adams: Sanctuary is an exhibition of large-scale sculpture, and mixed-media collage and assemblage on wood panels that reimagine safe destinations for the black American traveler during the mid-twentieth century. The body of work was inspired by The Negro Motorist Green Book, an annual guidebook for black American road-trippers published by New York postal worker Victor Hugo Green from 1936 to 1966, during the Jim Crow era in America.

Susan York Foundation - The Drawing Center
Through October 18, 2018 - Soho

For the second long-term installation presented in The Drawing Center's Lab Corridor, Santa Fe-based artist Susan York will create a site-specific installation that references the internal structure of the museum's 35 Wooster Street building. Using graphite as a sculptural rather than a two-dimensional medium, York will create replicas of parts of the museum's foundation: eroded concrete piers that protrude above the museum's ground floor. York's long-term installation will initiate an expanded field of activity at The Drawing Center, pointing to new opportunities for exploring drawing as an interactive and socially-minded practice. Additionally, by bringing attention to The Drawing Center's building, York's installation will generate opportunities for discussion about the importance of museums continuing as public spaces with permanent, physical presence

From the Collection: Artists at Mid to Late Career - MoMA : Museum of Modern Art
Through November 04, 2018 - New York

This presentation in the Museum's fourth-floor collection galleries will focus exclusively on works made by artists in their mid to late careers. Spanning from the late 1960s to today, the installation chronicles the many years of sustained experimentation, daring invention, and thoughtful reconsideration that distinguish an individual artist's career long after his or her breakthrough moment. Highlighting lesser-known works by prominent artists and key works by some less familiar names, Artists at Mid to Late Career provides another view of the history of art over the last half century. All works are drawn from MoMA's collection, and includes examples by Lee Bontecou, Louise Bourgeois, Melvin Edwards, Gego, Philip Guston, David Hammons, Jasper Johns, Maria Lassnig, Elizabeth Murray, Georgia O'Keeffe, Gerhard Richter, and many others.

Vertical Tour - Cathedral of Saint John the Divine
Through December 31, 2018 - New York

On this adventurous, "behind-the-scenes" tour, climb more than 124 feet through spiral staircases to the top of the world's largest cathedral. Learn stories through stained glass windows and sculpture and study the grand architecture of the Cathedral while standing on a buttress. The tour culminates on the roof with a sweeping view of Manhattan.

Inside You - American Musuem of Natural History
Through June 16, 2019 - New York

Did you know that your gastrointestinal tract is home to about 100 trillion bacteria? That's more organisms than there are stars in the Milky Way! Our bodies are home to many trillions of microbes, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and other organisms collectively called the human microbiome. In any human, microbial genes outnumber the genes in human DNA by more than 100 to one. This new perspective leads us to look at our bodies not just as individuals, but as entire ecosystems.Inside You explores the rapidly evolving science that is revolutionizing how we view human health and introduces some of the scientists who are breaking new ground in microbiome research.Inspired by the Museum's popular exhibition The Secret World Inside You, this exhibition introduces visitors to microbes that live in, on, and around all of us. Engaging graphics detail how microbes aid digestion, influence your immune system, and help fight harmful microbes. You'll find out how we acquire our microbiome and how it is shaped by the foods we eat and the environment we live in. Inside You is co-curated by Susan Perkins and Rob DeSalle, curators in the Museum's Division of Invertebrate Zoology and the ... (read more)

Picasso's Le Tricorne - New-York Historical Society
Through December 31, 2020 - Upper West Side

Now on display at the New-York Historical Society is a newly acquired and conserved Picasso in the exhibition Picasso's "Le Tricorne." It is the first work by Picasso, and one with great wall power and a New York history, to enter New-York Historical's collection. Pablo Picasso painted the stage curtain for the two-act ballet The Three-Cornered Hat (El sombrero de tres picos or Le tricorne). The ballet and curtain were commissioned by the impresario Sergei Diaghilev for his avant-garde, Paris-based Ballets Russes, the most influential ballet company of the twentieth-century. The ballet was choreographed by Léonide Massine with music by the Spanish composer Manuel de Falla. It premiered on July 22, 1919, at the Alhambra Theatre in London with sets, costume designs, and the monumental stage curtain created by Picasso. Picasso biographer John Richardson once called "Le Tricorne" the artist's "supreme theatrical achievement." The production, which was conceived by Diaghilev and Massine during a trip to Spain, was enhanced by its many Spanish collaborators, including Picasso who also designed the costumes and set for the ballet. Measuring roughly 20 feet square, the curtain depict... (read more)

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RESTAURANTS

Dutch Fred's Photos

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Brings together the character of Hell’s Kitchen past with th...

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Tissot  Photos

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Swiss luxury watch manufacturer for men and women since 1853...

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A state-of-the-art Coney Island amusement park that's home t...

SAVINGS OPPORTUNITIES

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This Week in New York City

(8/8-8/15) Looking for what to do in New York? We've got the latest on all the goings-on in NYC, from concerts to museum exhibitions to comedy to the best in city sightseeing. Read on for our picks for the best of this week in New York City. click here

This Week in New York City